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Oden Travia

Oden is a Treasure Trove of Intestinal Activity & Immunity Boosting Ingredients

Warming the intestines is fundamental to keeping the immune system strong. In fact, 70% of immune cells are concentrated in the small intestine. Oden contains a variety of ingredients, which is thought to have a very positive effect on the small intestine. Nutrients essential for boosting immunity are Protein Dietary fiber Minerals such as zinc and iron Calcium Vitamin A Vitamin C Vitamin E Vitamin B2 etc. Oden with plenty of warm broth is an excellent menu item for boosting immunity. The umami components of glutamic acid and inosinic acid contained in oden soup stock also work to suppress appetite. Since it is cooked without oil, it reduces the burden on the gastrointestinal tract even at late hours. It is also a treasure trove of gut-activating ingredients, such as kombu and konnyaku, which are rich in soluble dietary fiber; atsuage thick fried tofu and ganmo, which contain oligosaccharides that feed good bacteria; and daikon and cabbage, which aid digestion in the stomach and intestines. These foods are also gut-friendly, with low saturated fatty acids, which can put a burden on the intestines during digestion. Eggs are the strongest ingredient, rich in protein, vitamins, iron, zinc, and folic acid, and by making oden, even dietary fiber is soaked up. Of course oden is effective for the low carb diet in that it is low in carbohydrates, low in fat, and high in protein. And as it has a wide variety of ingredients, you do not get bored even if you eat often.


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Oden from Different Regions in Japan

Oden has rich regional flavors, and there are many unique local oden dishes throughout Japan that use local specialties for the broth, seasoning, and ingredients. The dashi soup stock, ingredients, flavor, and other characteristics unique to each region are explained respectively. There are some "local oden" named after places, such as Aomori Oden, Shizuoka Oden, and Kanazawa Oden. Find your favorite here.

Kanto Region Oden in the Kanto region uses dark soy sauce. A broth is made from kombu and dried bonito flakes, and seasoned with mirin sweet cooking sake and cooking sake. The ingredients are simmered thoroughly to soak up the flavor of the soy sauce and broth. Common ingredients include chikuwabu, hanpen, tsumire dumplings, etc. It is said that chikuwabu is used as an ingredient only in the Kanto region.

Kansai Region In Kansai, the soup stock is made from kombu, shiitake mushrooms, and light soy sauce, so it is not as dark in appearance and is lighter in flavor than in the Kanto region. In Kansai, oden is sometimes called Kanto-daki, which means stew from Kanto region.

Okinawa

Located in the southernmost part of Japan, oden in Okinawa is characterized by the use of pig's feet soup stock instead of soy sauce. Because of the warm climate, the broth is usually served cold, and the inclusion of pig's feet as an ingredient is an Okinawan specialty.

Aomori Aomori oden, which is dipped in miso sauce with ginger, is the most famous oden in Tohoku region. The origin of it is said to be the use of miso sauce with grated ginger to warm the body during the cold winter. Ingredients range from scallops and other seafood to bamboo shoots and other mountain delicacies. Generally, white konnyaku is used instead of black.

Shizuoka

Oden from Shizuoka prefecture is famous for its dark color. It uses dark soy sauce and broth from beef and chicken, which gives the broth a dark brown color and gives Shizuoka oden its unique flavor, much loved by Shizuoka residents. Also, kuro hanpen black fish cake, made from processed fish such as sardines and mackerel, which makes the broth even darker.

Aichi In Nagoya, Aichi Prefecture, soy sauce is used as a dipping sauce, not as a base for soup stock. Miso oden, stewed in hatcho miso, has a light, sweet flavor, and local aka-miso (red miso) is sometimes added. In Nagoya, some people call it Kanto-daki, and konnyaku and tofu are usually added.

Ishikawa Kanazawa Oden from Ishikawa prefecture is the famous local oden of Hokuriku region. A broth is made from kombu and niboshi dried sardines to create a gentle and elegant soup with a palate-pleasing sweet soy sauce. A wide variety of ingredients are used, including kani-zura (crab shells stuffed with crab meat), bai-gai shells, fu (wheat gluten), ganmodoki (steamed bean curd), akamaki (red rolls) (spiral-shaped paste) and Kaga vegetables.


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Oden is Over 800 Years Old

Oden is said to have originated as tofu dengaku, which is tofu cut into smaller pieces, skewered on bamboo sticks, and baked. Records show that this existed at least as late as the Heian period (794-1192). In the beginning, it was very simple, just sprinkled with salt.

Dengaku


Then, in the Kansai region, konnyaku was warmed in komb dashi broth and dipped in sweet miso paste. This was the birth of stewed dengaku. This is said to be the prototype of today's oden, which is full of soup, but at that time the soup was not seasoned. In the late Edo period (1603-1867), soy sauce brewing flourished in Choshi and Noda near Edo (Tokyo), and cheap soy sauce became available to the general public. In the Edo period, when the quickness was pursued, the Kansai-style miso oden, which was eaten after being heated and coated with miso paste, was time-consuming, so Edo-style oden, which was stewed in soy sauce-based broth and eaten as is, became popular. In the Meiji era (1868-1912), the variety of oden dishes increased dramatically with the introduction of fishcakes, and the oden became more and more popular as it was stewed and then served in its own broth. Oden as we know it was gradually taking on a more and more solid form. The dark color of soy sauce was not favored in Kansai, and light soy sauce was used. It is called Kansai-daki, which means Kansai stew. In the Showa period (1926-1989), oden became available at candy stores, izakaya (Japanese style pubs), and food stalls because of its quick and easy eating convenience. When it was introduced in convenience stores in 1979, it became even more readily available.

Dengaku


Then, in the Kansai region, konnyaku was warmed in komb dashi broth and dipped in sweet miso paste. This was the birth of stewed dengaku. This is said to be the prototype of today's oden, which is full of soup, but at that time the soup was not seasoned. In the late Edo period (1603-1867), soy sauce brewing flourished in Choshi and Noda near Edo (Tokyo), and cheap soy sauce became available to the general public. In the Edo period, when the quickness was pursued, the Kansai-style miso oden, which was eaten after being heated and coated with miso paste, was time-consuming, so Edo-style oden, which was stewed in soy sauce-based broth and eaten as is, became popular. In the Meiji era (1868-1912), the variety of oden dishes increased dramatically with the introduction of fishcakes, and the oden became more and more popular as it was stewed and then served in its own broth. Oden as we know it was gradually taking on a more and more solid form. The dark color of soy sauce was not favored in Kansai, and light soy sauce was used. It is called Kansai-daki, which means Kansai stew. In the Showa period (1926-1989), oden became available at candy stores, izakaya (Japanese style pubs), and food stalls because of its quick and easy eating convenience. When it was introduced in convenience stores in 1979, it became even more readily available.


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There is a lot of food items, housewares, stationery, and gifts available at the store and our online store, Maido! Kairashi Shop, where you can place your order for shipping or store pickup! Happy shopping. :)

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