Mayo, What's The Difference?

Updated: May 24



Mayonnaise, Let's Talk About It


Mayonnaise, we’ve all heard of it, if not used in a plethora of recipes ranging from a simple sandwich to your grandma’s secret egg salad recipe she refuses to pass on. That’s why I was quite surprised to learn that there was a different type of mayo out there. Even in my memories of the one trip I took to Japan I thought that the mayo was the same just in Japan.


However it wasn't until I started working at Maido that I learned they were different. Quite a few customers ask us about it often. “What’s the difference between Japanese mayo and American mayo?” they say. Japanese mayo is still mayo, but it doesn’t taste quite the same as American mayo.


Kewpie mayo was created in 1925 using only the yolk of the egg. This gives the mayo a rich eggy flavor. It’s also mixed with ingredients including some brewed vinegar, edible vegetable oil, salt, and spices. All together the mayo ends up with a thick yet creamy smooth texture with a slightly sweet taste. Thanks to this combination the mayo keeps its fresh taste without chemical preservatives. The bottle Kewpie mayo comes in also makes it easier to use.


Compare that to American mayo which uses the whole egg. Mixed with a distilled vinegar we’re left with a thick but not so creamy mayo. Add to that the distilled vinegar that’s used, American mayo ends up with ‘acidic’ sour flavor. Don’t get me wrong, I'm a big fan of mayo myself. Hellmann’s is my personal favorite. Yet after multiple dishes both at work and home, Kewpie has given American mayo a run for its money.


Although not the only brand from Japan, Kewpie is quite popular. It's even become popular here in America as more people learn about it. Thanks to social media more Asian and Asian American families are able to share their world and their food with us. That includes Maido, Kewpie mayo sells fast because customers love using it.


Whether you saw it on social media or you recently found a recipe you want to try, Kewpie mayo is sure to be one item your taste buds will thank you for. It’s great on yakisoba, with salmon and rice, or your own homemade Poke bowl. Which we recently posted a recipe for. Why don't you get some the next time you stop by!



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